Skip to Content

As a result of the current Federal government funding situation, the information on this website may not be up to date or acted upon.

The NIH Clinical Center (the research hospital of NIH) is open. For more details about its operating status, please visit https://cc.nih.gov.

Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at https://www.opm.gov.

Discovering the causes of cancer and the means of prevention

Publications Search - Abstract View

Title: A prospective evaluation of C-reactive protein levels and colorectal adenoma development.
Authors: Gunter MJ,  Cross AJ,  Huang WY,  Stanczyk FZ,  Purdue M,  Xue X,  Schoen R,  Limburg PJ,  Schatzkin A,  Sinha R,  Hayes RB
Journal: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Date: 2011 Mar
Branches: MEB, OEEB
PubMed ID: 21212059
PMC ID: PMC3051036
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Inflammation is hypothesized to play a role in colorectal tumorigenesis. Circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a serologic marker of the inflammatory response, have been positively associated with colorectal cancer development in some studies; however, there are limited data on the relation of CRP with colorectal adenomas, established precursors of colorectal cancer. METHODS: A nested case-control investigation of CRP levels and incident colorectal adenoma was conducted in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, a randomized trial of 154,942 individuals designed to test the efficacy of flexible sigmoidoscopy on colorectal cancer mortality when performed once, and then repeated 3 to 5 years later. Serum CRP levels were measured in baseline blood specimens from participants who were free of polyps in the left-sided colorectum at the baseline screening procedure, but who were found at the subsequent screen to have at least one colorectal adenoma (n=356), and in a set of polyp-free, frequency-matched controls (n=396). RESULTS: In a multivariable logistic regression model that included established colorectal adenoma risk factors, a 1-unit increase in log CRP level was associated with a 15% reduction in risk of developing colorectal adenoma (OR=0.85, 95% CI, 0.75-0.98, Ptrend=0.01). This association did not differ according to body size, smoking behavior, gender, use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, or adenoma location. CONCLUSIONS: High circulating CRP levels may be protective against colorectal adenoma development. IMPACT: Though at contrast with mechanistic data on inflammation and colorectal tumorigenesis, this finding is not inconsistent with prior results on CRP and colorectal adenoma and warrants further investigation.