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Title: Serum vitamin D and risk of pancreatic cancer in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian screening trial.
Authors: Stolzenberg-Solomon RZ,  Hayes RB,  Horst RL,  Anderson KE,  Hollis BW,  Silverman DT
Journal: Cancer Res
Date: 2009 Feb 15
Branches: NEB, OEEB
PubMed ID: 19208842
PMC ID: PMC3052200
Abstract: Experimental evidence suggests that vitamin D has anticarcinogenic properties; however, a nested case-control study conducted in a population of male Finnish smokers found that higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], the best indicator of vitamin D status as determined by the sun and diet, was associated with a significant 3-fold increased risk for pancreatic cancer. We conducted a nested case-control study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Screening Trial cohort of men and women 55 to 74 years of age at baseline to test whether prediagnostic serum 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Between 1994 and 2006, 184 incident cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma occurred (follow-up to 11.7 years). Two controls (n = 368) who were alive at the time the case was diagnosed were selected for each case and matched by age, race, sex, and calendar date of blood draw (to control for seasonal variation). We calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for smoking and body mass index. Vitamin D concentrations were not associated with pancreatic cancer overall (highest versus lowest quintile, >82.3 versus <45.9 nmol/L: OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.66-3.15; P trend = 0.49). However, positive associations were observed among subjects with low estimated annual residential solar UBV exposure, but not among those with moderate to high annual exposure (P interaction = 0.015). We did not confirm the previous strong positive association between 25(OH)D and pancreatic cancer; however, the increased risk among participants with low residential UVB exposure is similar.