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Title: Cross-cancer pleiotropic analysis of endometrial cancer: PAGE and E2C2 consortia.
Authors: Setiawan VW,  Schumacher F,  Prescott J,  Haessler J,  Malinowski J,  Wentzensen N,  Yang H,  Chanock S,  Brinton L,  Hartge P,  Lissowska J,  Park SL,  Cheng I,  Bush WS,  Crawford DC,  Ursin G,  Horn-Ross P,  Bernstein L,  Lu L,  Risch H,  Yu H,  Sakoda LC,  Doherty J,  Chen C,  Jackson R,  Yasmeen S,  Cote M,  Kocarnik JM,  Peters U,  Kraft P,  De Vivo I,  Haiman CA,  Kooperberg C,  Le Marchand L
Journal: Carcinogenesis
Date: 2014 May 15
Branches: EBP, HREB, LTG, NEB, OD, OEEB
PubMed ID: 24832084
PMC ID: not available
Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a large number of cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), several of which have been associated with multiple cancer sites suggesting pleiotropic effects and shared biological mechanisms across some cancers. We hypothesized that SNPs associated with other cancers may be additionally associated with endometrial cancer. We examined 213 SNPs previously associated with 14 other cancers for their associations with endometrial cancer in 3758 endometrial cancer cases and 5966 controls of European ancestry from two consortia: Population Architecture Using Genomics and Epidemiology and the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium. Study-specific logistic regression estimates adjusted for age, body mass index and the most significant principal components of genetic ancestry were combined using fixed-effect meta-analysis to evaluate the association between each SNP and endometrial cancer risk. A Bonferroni-corrected P value of 2.35×10(-4) was used to determine statistical significance of the associations. SNP rs7679673, ~6.3kb upstream of TET2 and previously reported to be associated with prostate cancer risk, was associated with endometrial cancer risk in the direction opposite to that for prostate cancer [meta-analysis odds ratio = 0.87 (per copy of the C allele), 95% confidence interval = 0.81, 0.93; P = 7.37×10(-5)] with no evidence of heterogeneity across studies (P heterogeneity = 0.66). This pleiotropic analysis is the first to suggest TET2 as a susceptibility locus for endometrial cancer.