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Title: Nucleotide excision repair polymorphisms may modify ionizing radiation-related breast cancer risk in US radiologic technologists.
Authors: Rajaraman P,  Bhatti P,  Doody MM,  Simon SL,  Weinstock RM,  Linet MS,  Rosenstein M,  Stovall M,  Alexander BH,  Preston DL,  Sigurdson AJ
Journal: Int J Cancer
Date: 2008 Dec 1
Branches: REB
PubMed ID: 18767034
PMC ID: PMC3984912
Abstract: Exposure to ionizing radiation has been consistently associated with increased risk of female breast cancer. Although the majority of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation is corrected by the base-excision repair pathway, certain types of multiple-base damage can only be repaired through the nucleotide excision repair pathway. In a nested case-control study of breast cancer in US radiologic technologists exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation (858 cases, 1,083 controls), we examined whether risk of breast cancer conferred by radiation was modified by nucleotide excision gene polymorphisms ERCC2 (XPD) rs13181, ERCC4 (XPF) rs1800067 and rs1800124, ERCC5 (XPG) rs1047769 and rs17655; and ERCC6 rs2228526. Of the 6 ERCC variants examined, only ERCC5 rs17655 showed a borderline main effect association with breast cancer risk (OR(GC) = 1.1, OR(CC) = 1.3; p-trend = 0.08), with some indication that individuals carrying the C allele variant were more susceptible to the effects of occupational radiation (EOR/Gy(GG) = 1.0, 95% CI = <0, 6.0; EOR/Gy(GC/CC) = 5.9, 95% CI = 0.9, 14.4; p(het) = 0.10). ERCC2 rs13181, although not associated with breast cancer risk overall, statistically significantly modified the effect of occupational radiation dose on risk of breast cancer (EOR/Gy(AA) = 9.1, 95% CI = 2.1-21.3; EOR/Gy(AC/CC) = 0.6, 95% CI = <0, 4.6; p(het) = 0.01). These results suggest that common variants in nucleotide excision repair genes may modify the association between occupational radiation exposure and breast cancer risk.