Skip to Content

Publications Search - Abstract View

Title: Body mass index and risk of death in Asian Americans.
Authors: Park Y,  Wang S,  Kitahara CM,  Moore SC,  Berrington de Gonzalez A,  Bernstein L,  Chang ET,  Flint AJ,  Freedman DM,  Gaziano JM,  Hoover RN,  Linet MS,  Purdue M,  Robien K,  Schairer C,  Sesso HD,  White E,  Willcox BJ,  Thun MJ,  Hartge P,  Willett WC
Journal: Am J Public Health
Date: 2014 Mar
Branches: BB, EBP, NEB, OEEB, REB
PubMed ID: 24432919
PMC ID: PMC3953786
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: We investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and mortality among Asian Americans. METHODS: We pooled data from prospective cohort studies with 20 672 Asian American adults with no baseline cancer or heart disease history. We estimated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) with Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: A high, but not low, BMI was associated with increased risk of total mortality among individuals aged 35 to 69 years. The BMI was not related to total mortality among individuals aged 70 years and older. With a BMI 22.5 to < 25 as the reference category among never-smokers aged 35 to 69 years, the hazard ratios for total mortality were 0.83 (95% CI = 0.47, 1.47) for BMI 15 to < 18.5; 0.91 (95% CI = 0.62, 1.32) for BMI 18.5 to < 20; 1.08 (95% CI = 0.86, 1.36) for BMI 20 to < 22.5; 1.14 (95% CI = 0.90, 1.44) for BMI 25 to < 27.5; 1.13 (95% CI = 0.79, 1.62) for BMI 27.5 to < 30; 1.82 (95% CI = 1.25, 2.64) for BMI 30 to < 35; and 2.09 (95% CI = 1.06, 4.11) for BMI 35 to 50. Higher BMI was also related to increased cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality. CONCLUSIONS: High BMI is associated with increased mortality risk among Asian Americans.