Skip to Content

Publications Search - Abstract View

Title: Familial testicular germ cell tumor: no associated syndromic pattern identified.
Authors: Mueller CM,  Korde LA,  McMaster ML,  Peters JA,  Bratslavsky G,  Watkins RJ,  Ling A,  Kratz CP,  Wulfsberg EA,  Rosenberg PS,  Greene MH
Journal: Hered Cancer Clin Pract
Date: 2014
Branches: BB, CGB, GEB
PubMed ID: 24559313
PMC ID: PMC3937045
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is the most common malignancy in young men. Familial clustering, epidemiologic evidence of increased risk with family or personal history, and the association of TGCT with genitourinary (GU) tract anomalies have suggested an underlying genetic predisposition. Linkage data have not identified a rare, highly-penetrant, single gene in familial TGCT (FTGCT) cases. Based on its association with congenital GU tract anomalies and suggestions that there is an intrauterine origin to TGCT, we hypothesized the existence of unrecognized dysmorphic features in FTGCT. METHODS: We evaluated 38 FTGCT individuals and 41 first-degree relatives from 22 multiple-case families with detailed dysmorphology examinations, physician-based medical history and physical examination, laboratory testing, and genitourinary imaging studies. RESULTS: The prevalence of major abnormalities and minor variants did not significantly differ between either FTGCT individuals or their first-degree relatives when compared with normal population controls, except for tall stature, macrocephaly, flat midface, and retro-/micrognathia. However, these four traits were not manifest as a constellation of features in any one individual or family. We did detect an excess prevalence of the genitourinary anomalies cryptorchidism and congenital inguinal hernia in our population, as previously described in sporadic TGCT, but no congenital renal, retroperitoneal or mediastinal anomalies were detected. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our study did not identify a constellation of dysmorphic features in FTGCT individuals, which is consistent with results of genetic studies suggesting that multiple low-penetrance genes are likely responsible for FTGCT susceptibility.