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Title: Relation of age and self-reported chronic medical condition status with dietary nutrient intake in the US population.
Authors: Kant AK,  Schatzkin A
Journal: J Am Coll Nutr
Date: 1999 Feb
Branches: MEB
PubMed ID: 10067661
PMC ID: not available
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of nutrient intake with age and self-reported chronic medical condition status in a large, nationally representative sample. METHODS: We used data from the Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals, 1989-1991. The analytic sample included subjects aged > or =25 years with 3 days of dietary data, and medical condition information (n=7,207). A positive response to having been informed by a doctor of having diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, cancer, osteoporosis, and stroke indicated the presence of chronic medical condition(s) (n=2,368). Sex-specific linear and logistic regression analyses adjusted for multiple covariates were used to examine the relation of age and morbidity status with nutrient intake. RESULTS: In men, age was associated with an increased risk of consuming <100% of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of vitamin E, vitamin B12, calcium, zinc, and iron (p<0.05), and self-reported morbidity was associated with an increased risk of consuming <100% of the RDA of protein. Relative to men, women were more likely to report less than the RDA of most nutrients examined; however, neither age nor chronic disease status were associated with increased likelihood of reporting <100% of the RDA of any of the nutrients examined. In women, the probability of reporting <100% of the RDA of vitamin A, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin C, and iron, and in men, the probability of reporting <100% of the RDA of vitamin C, declined with age (p<0.05). No adverse effect of age and chronic disease interaction on intake of most nutrients was noted in men or women. CONCLUSIONS: Chronologic age and morbidity were associated with an increased risk of inadequate intake of several nutrients in free-living, independent men but not in women.