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Title: Divergent trends for gastric cancer incidence by anatomical subsite in US adults.
Authors: Camargo MC,  Anderson WF,  King JB,  Correa P,  Thomas CC,  Rosenberg PS,  Eheman CR,  Rabkin CS
Journal: Gut
Date: 2011 Dec
Branches: BB, IIB
PubMed ID: 21613644
PMC ID: PMC3202077
Abstract: BACKGROUND AND AIM: Age-specific analyses of non-cardia gastric cancer incidence reveal divergent trends among US whites: rates are declining in individuals aged 40 years and older but rising in younger persons. To investigate this heterogeneity further, incidence trends were evaluated by anatomical subsite. METHODS: Gastric cancer incidence data for 1976-2007 were obtained from the US National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR). Incidence rates and estimated annual percentage change were calculated by age group (25-39, 40-59 and 60-84 years), race/ethnicity and subsite. RESULTS: Based on data from the nine oldest SEER registries (covering ~10% of the US population), rates for all non-cardia subsites decreased in whites and blacks, except for corpus cancer, which increased between 1976 and 2007 with estimated annual percentage changes of 1.0% (95% CI 0.1% to 1.9%) for whites and 3.5% (95% CI 1.8% to 5.2%) for blacks. In contrast, rates for all non-cardia subsites including corpus cancer declined among other races. In combined data from NPCR and SEER registries (covering 89% of the US population), corpus cancer significantly increased between 1999 and 2007 among younger and middle-aged whites; in ethnic-specific analyses, rates significantly increased among the same age groups in non-Hispanic whites and were stable among Hispanic whites. Age-specific rates for all subsites declined or were stable in this period among blacks and other races. CONCLUSIONS: Long- and short-term incidence trends for gastric cancers indicate a shifting distribution by anatomical subsite. Corpus cancer may have distinctive aetiology and changing risk factor exposures, warranting further investigation.