Skip to Content
Discovering the causes of cancer and the means of prevention

Publications Search - Abstract View

Title: Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of esophageal and gastric cancer: Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers.
Authors: Abnet CC,  Chen Y,  Chow WH,  Gao YT,  Helzlsouer KJ,  Le Marchand L,  McCullough ML,  Shikany JM,  Virtamo J,  Weinstein SJ,  Xiang YB,  Yu K,  Zheng W,  Albanes D,  Arslan AA,  Campbell DS,  Campbell PT,  Hayes RB,  Horst RL,  Kolonel LN,  Nomura AM,  Purdue MP,  Snyder K,  Shu XO
Journal: Am J Epidemiol
Date: 2010 Jul 1
Branches: BB, NEB, OEEB, IIB
PubMed ID: 20562192
PMC ID: PMC2892544
Abstract: Upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancers of the stomach and esophagus have high incidence and mortality worldwide, but they are uncommon in Western countries. Little information exists on the association between vitamin D and risk of upper GI cancers. This study examined the association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and upper GI cancer risk in the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers. Concentrations of 25(OH)D were measured from 1,065 upper GI cancer cases and 1,066 age-, sex-, race-, and season-of blood draw-matched controls from 8 prospective cohort studies. In multivariate-adjusted models, circulating 25(OH)D concentration was not significantly associated with upper GI cancer risk. Subgroup analysis by race showed that among Asians, but not Caucasians, lower concentrations of 25(OH)D (<25 nmol/L) were associated with a statistically significant decreased risk of upper GI cancer (reference: 50-<75 nmol/L) (odds ratio = 0.53, 95% confidence interval: 0.31, 0.91; P trend = 0.003). Never smokers with concentrations of <25 nmol/L showed a lower risk of upper GI cancers (odds ratio = 0.55, 95% confidence interval: 0.31, 0.96). Subgroup analyses by alcohol consumption produced opposing trends. Results do not support the hypothesis that interventions aimed at increasing vitamin D status would lead to a lower risk of these highly fatal cancers.